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Oak and Olive, Portland, December 4, 2016

I see I have not posted on this blog since August, and that was not about pizza. It’s not that we haven’t eaten pizza almost weekly. We have! For the final few weeks of our Roman residence, we returned to old favorites: Da Remo, La Pratolina, Dar Poeta, and of course Taverna Rossini, each previously reviewed here on OWP. Each bite reminded us how much we would come to miss the pizza in Italy.

At first glance I thought there was a wood-fired oven, but it is actually heated by gas jets.

At first glance, I thought there was a wood-fired oven, but it is actually heated by gas jets.

Now back in the U.S. for six weeks, we have cautiously re-entered the pizza market in Portland. Ripping the bandage off of our pizza snobbery, our son brought home Papa Murphy’s pizza the first night we were here. We used to eat Papa Murphy’s almost weekly. It’s served very hot since it is baked at home and they use good ingredients but falls far short of Italian pizza. As Ric quipped, “It’s good, but it’s not pizza.” It requires a category of its own.

Ric and I shared a pizza Margherita, enhanced with a liberal serving of anchovies.

Ric and I shared a pizza Margherita, enhanced with a liberal serving of anchovies.

Last week we met friends at a newish place, Oak and Olive. Very sleek and shiny, it radiated nuovo Italian resembling some of the newer spaces built-out in Roma. A wood-fired oven is a significant factor in turning out THE BEST crust, and while Oak and Olive turned out decent pizza, the oven provides ambiance more than an improved product.

The menu is far from traditional. It features some inventive pizze. (Pizze is the plural of pizza. I cannot bring myself to type “pizzas.” It’s almost as bad as “paninos.”) The chef’s inventiveness will appeal to some and send others straight to the pasta menu. I am told the lamb pizza is terrific and our friends’ roasted garlic pizza looked and smelled divine. We were happy with our pizza Margherita enhanced with anchovies. The latter were rather salty by Italian standards but the entire experience supported Ric’s theory that Papa Murphy’s needs its own category. Oak and Olive produces a good pizza.

Oak and Olive served the most perfect shot of espresso we have had since leaving Italy.

Oak and Olive served the most perfect shot of espresso we have had since leaving Italy.

Each couple shared a salad (two options,large and small; the small size is quite sufficient for two) and a pizza (also more-than-enough), and between the four of us just one bottle of wine. It was lunchtime and we had to drive. We topped off the meal with a perfect espresso. One sip practically transported us back to Roma. Well done.

The bill, delivered with the coffee and no need to request it, would have sobered me up even if I had had caffè corretto: $104.00 plus tip! Two salads, two pizzas, one bottle of wine — at the “modest” price of $40.00 it was at the low end of the price list — and four espressi. Made me miss Roma even more.

JC and Maarja enjoyed a Roasted Garlic pizza with the addition of salami and olives.

JC and Maarja enjoyed a Roasted Garlic pizza with the addition of salami and olives.

Pizza Quality: 2 Very fresh produce, lovely cheese, and high points for creativity. The number of selections is small, though, and I cannot bring myself to give a “3” to anything that does not come out of a wood-fired oven. I loved that our pizza Margherita had oodles of basil. In Italy, you get one or two leaves. 

Service: 2 I am still getting used to American service. I do not want to become besties with my server and at Oak and Olive at least they did not exchange names with guests. Service felt a little uneven, though. There was quite a long wait between salad and pizza, which was fine since we were chatting away, but could be annoying to some. The wine glasses (see picture) are odd. Sometimes traditional is better, i.e., stemware when you are paying $40.00 for the wine. 

This is the Oak and Olive wine glass. Only half-full now as time of the photo, the server had filled it right to the top, which woudl be nice for a bar poor but is very odd when one has purchased a bottle.

This is the Oak and Olive wine glass. Only half-full when I took the photo, the server had filled it right to the top, which would be nice for a bar pour but is very odd when one has purchased a bottle. It would make a nice condiment dish for serving ketchup.

Ambiance: 3  Attractive and sleek, I liked it. At night, when the place is full, it might be a bit noisy, and the huge expanse of glass might make it a little warm in summer, but at this visit, I liked it. 

Total Points: 7

Returnability: Go-to Place  fine if you are in the area

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Antica Taverna, Roma, August 27, 2016

We have completed our fourth week without pizza, are down a few pounds, and generally feeling like we are eating healthier. My jeans fit better and I had to throw out a pair of hiking pants that threatened to fall down. Despite the heat, we had a remarkable 95,000 steps on the pedometer for the week. Bravissimi noi!

Antica Taverna has a special place in our hearts and stomachs. We celebrated Thanksgiving there in 2012 and 2014, We’ve dined there for Christmas Eve four times, and twice on New Year’s Eve, plus about once-a-month year-round. It’s in the Good Day Rome Guide to Restaurants and we take most of our visitors there. We like the place. A lot. It’s like going home when we go to AT.

Antica Taverna's golden glow. It's away from the Piazza Navona hordes so you have to want to find it.

Antica Taverna’s golden glow. It’s away from the Piazza Navona hordes so you have to want to find it.

We were turned on to AT during our first trip to Italy, long before living here was even a thought. Being completely exhausted from touring all day, for two nights we dragged ourselves to an enoteca a stone’s throw from our lodging, Cul-de-Sac. A Canadian couple seated next to us said we should venture a bit farther to this place. They could not remember the name of it, but directed us, in very Italian fashion, to “Go down this street to the scaffolding and turn right. You can’t miss it.” That scaffolding guided us for almost two years as we returned in 2011 and 2012. I won’t go into all the facets of the story that have endeared us to Antica Taverna but the staff is very kind, the owner gracious, the atmosphere relaxed and happy, and they serve good Roman food at a fair price. When you dine there often, you get a sconto for being a friend and often a complimentary focaccia. Love it.

Just a few diners enjoying the soft August night.

Just a few diners enjoying the soft August night.

So this week’s pizza substitute was a meal at Antica Taverna. We asked Giovanni (our personal waiter and the restaurant manager) to hold the focaccia. “Siete in dieta?” he inquired. “Sí, meno carboidrato.” (Are you dieting? Yes, low carbohydrate.) We started with prosciutto and melon (hey, those are healthy carbs!) and moved on to our generous secondi of roasted lamb and roasted chicken. A bottle of house red washed it all down. The price was about what we pay for pizza, wine, and fritti at Taverna Rossini.

Over the years we have drifted to favorite dishes. Mine is the melanzane al forno (eggplant parm to Americans), which is made without any breading in Italy. But we had been eating eggplant at home all week, so I needed a little chicken. Ric loves the trippa (tripe), which I suppose he could have on a low-carb plan as it’s all protein. The lamb is good, the duck when they have it is excellent, and I love the sauteed mussels. When we dine with more people we like to order the sharable antipasto della casa which is an array of cooked vegetables accompanied by cheese and salume. It’s not on the menu; you have to know about it. We insiders know these things.

At Antica Taverna si mangia bene ma costo meno (one eats well but it costs little).

We did not suffer for lack of pizza, but we might break our diet on Thursday when we are scheduled to meet friends at another favorite place, Dar Poeta. Watch for a review.

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La Buca di Ripetta, Roma, August 19, 2016

La Buca means hole, and can even refer to a subterranean trattoria, but La Buca di Ripetta (literally “the hole in Ripetta Street) is a far cry from a “hole.” We average dining here about once-a-year. We should come here more often. It is very close to the lively scene at Piazza del Popolo, but down a quiet street.

Small, reservations usually necessary. Intimate yet not dull, lovely service.

Small, reservations usually necessary. Intimate yet not dull, lovely service.

As we continue our avoidance of white foods and sugars, this week La Buca replaced pizza night. This is our third Friday without pizza. We’ve each lost a few pounds — not as much as we’d like — but we are not crazy enough to give up wine. As Ben Franklin said, “Wine is constant proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”

One of four antipasti in our slection, salm tartar. Silky and delicious.

One of four antipasti in our selection, salmon tartar. Silky and delicious.

We started with an antipasto misto of four items, but we ate two before I remembered my mission to capture the dinner for the blog. Avoiding the bread basket while quaffing sipping our wine, we were hungry! The butterflied shrimp were divine, and because there is never enough octopus, we had carpaccio. The two remaining items, pictured here, we practically fought over.

Moscardini in umido (baby octopus in sauce), another antipasto. We made short work of the lovely butterflied shrimp before I remembered to take a picture.

Moscardini in umido (baby octopus in sauce), another antipasto. We made short work of the lovely butterflied shrimp before I remembered to take a picture.

 

Moving on to our main course, having two preparations as an antipasto was not enough, so Ric ordered the grilled tentacles. How we will miss these options when we come back to the U.S! If you know of a place in the U.S. that does a great job with octopus tentacles — NOT deep fried — please comment!

My Saltimbocca alla Romana was classically prepared and did, indeed, jump into my mouth. The roasted potatoes served alongside were evil, but luckily they served a controlled number and Ric was kind enough to help me.

This is fine dining and the price tag certainly exceeded a pizza night out, but we gladly paid it for a quality Mediterranean meal. Yes, there were some tourists here, after all, it is a stone’s throw from party central in Piazza del Popolo, but there are many locals dining here as well. Including us!

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Siciliainbocca, Roma, August 13, 2016

Pasta, pizza, potatoes, bread, and rice are still off the menu for us, so OWP continues to bring you other great Roman restaurants for your vicarious pleasure. This week, we ventured across the Tevere to Siciliainbocca, which means “Sicily in the mouth.” Break it down: Sicilia in Bocca. We loved the food on our trip to Sicilia in 2013, and Siciliainbocca is the closest approximation we have found in Roma. Wonderful fresh fish, delightful Sicilian pasta dishes such as pasta alla Norma, and a broad selection of Sicilian wines, all at what the Italians would call honest prices. (A review on Tripadvisor that says prezzi onesti is quite the praise from a Roman.) And we were able to maintain our lowish-carb diet.

A can't miss it exterior on an obscure street in Prati, Siciliainbocca is a 10-minute walk from our tram.

A can’t miss it exterior on an obscure street in Prati, Siciliainbocca is a 10-minute walk from our tram.

This was our fourth or fifth trip to Siciliainbocca. Mostly we visit as a couple, but one night a few months ago, The Rome Dining Club, consisting of 3 couples from the embassy, enjoyed a convivial meal here. The place attracts a lot of large groups: families out with Nonna as well as groups of friends. Unlike many Roman eateries, it fills up early. By 20:15 on this particular Saturday night the place was half-full while most of Rome was vacant due to the August ferie

OUr mixed seafood antipasto had carpaccio of sword fish, insalata del mare, and more. This is only half of the serving! Plenty for two.

Our mixed seafood antipasto had carpaccio of swordfish, insalata del mare, and more. This is only half of the serving! Plenty for two.

Service is brisk but pleasant. Although I speak passable Italian, when it was time to order, our server brought along an English-speaking colleague, who laughed when I ordered in Italian and said he clearly was not needed. The menu is in both languages and despite a couple of odd translations, is easy enough to understand. (I love this misplaced modifier: “peas with a heart of cheese.”)

I’ll let the pictures speak for the food. The quality is excellent, the pacing perfect. As with any good restaurant in Italy, we owned the table for the evening and could have lingered. We left not a drop in the bottle of our fine Donna Fugata Anthilia, and a perfect shot of espresso ensured we would stay awake on the tram ride home.

Please pardon the yellow tinge to the pictures. I used my phone’s camera and the restaurant itself is so very YELLOW that everything came out looking a bit jaundiced.

A very pleasant room, semi-outdoors, tented but brightly lighted. Not exactly designed for romantic trysts. More for dinner with Nonna.

A very pleasant room, semi-outdoors, tented but brightly lighted. Not exactly designed for romantic trysts. More for dinner with Nonna.

A mixed seafood grill for Ric. As usual, the diner has to do some work. I never order shrimp in Italy because I hate that they are presented with shells on. Messy.

A mixed seafood grill for Ric. As usual, the diner has to do some work. I never order shrimp in Italy because I hate that they are presented with shells on. Messy.

I can eat cozze e vongole (clams and mussels) all night. And did.

I can eat cozze e vongole (clams and mussels) all night. And did.

Caponata is a fine Sicilian dish and everyone has a different approach. This is good; Ric's is better.

Caponata is a fine Sicilian dish and everyone has a different approach. This is good; Ric’s is better.

 

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La Fraschetta del Pesce, Roma, August 6, 2016

Our Weekly Pizza is going lo-carb. For four weeks we consumed amazing pasta, strudel, and the wonderful bread of the Alto Adige. We were hiking to work it off, but now that we are back in the flatlands of Roma, something had to change for a few weeks. Protein and vegetables are on the menu, along with enough wine and grappa to keep us from wanting to dive off the 3rd-floor terrace.

The Captain, Marco, and me. If I look like I've had half-a-bottle of Vermentino, it's because I did.

The Captain, Marco, and me. If I look like I’ve had half-a-bottle of Vermentino, it’s because I did.

This is, of course, a golden opportunity to fill you in on some other great dining establishments in Roma. As we wind down our time in Italy, we are revisiting places that are special to us, so OWP will take you along for the ride. It will not be forever, this hiatus from pizza. We might make it three or four weeks.

The first week of our self-induced deprivation we took our visiting friend, Zoe, to what is one of our favorite restaurants in Roma: La Fraschetta del Pesce. It is not an easy place to get to as it is far outside the zone tourists frequent, so we hopped in a cab  from Piazza Navona with Zoe at a cost of about €15.00.

Today with the antipasto, a bruschetta taking advantage of abundant summer tomatoes and a bit of fresh anchovy.

Today with the antipastobruschetta taking advantage of abundant summer tomatoes and a bit of fresh anchovy.

When we first arrived in Roma, Ric found La Fraschetta thanks to a 2012 article in The Guardian: “Where to eat in Rome — by the city’s cabbies.” This list has led us to some terrific venues and great meals, and one clinker. But I digress. We have been dining with Il Comandante (Captain) — Marco Magliozzi — for 4 years, and we cannot get enough of it.

Mussesl -- or cozze -- plump and delicious. I could eat these all night.

Mussels — or cozze — plump and delicious. I could eat these all night.

The first time we visited, my Italian was not very good but we struggled through with the non-English-speaking owner and staff.  At the end of our meal, Marco came and knelt by the table. “Come ci avete trovato?” (How did you find us?) Although he was pleased by the answer, he certainly does not need to promote: his place is full every night. People without reservations are turned away at the door. By now, when I call to reserve, he recognizes my voice and we are warmly welcomed as regulars, although we only make it here 4 or 5 times a year.

Calamari alla piastra, or grilled calamari, our other favorite.

Calamari alla piastra, or grilled calamari, another favorite.

Marco used to be a fisherman and has owned fish stores. Now his son does the fishing out of Anzio and everything is fresh and simply prepared. The staff is well-trained and operates with little direction from Marco. Marco takes every order personally, but the guys and gals in sailor shirts deliver the goods. And it comes out fast!

Zoe's calamari fritti. Not greasy, not previously frozen. Made fresh daily.

Zoe’s calamari fritti. Not greasy, not previously frozen. Made fresh daily.

We always start with the Antipasto al Portodanzese a reference to the provenance of the products, Anzio. This spread for two people could be called dinner. (With Zoe along, we let Il Comandante talk us into two portions. Error!) Dish after dish of beautiful seafood arrived: Huge bowls of mussels steamed in white wine and herbs, fried calamari, fresh alici, fried shrimp, bruschetta with alici, and sometimes more. Sometimes things I don’t recognize, but it is all delicious.

A server is a blur as she acreens through the restaurant, delivering great seafood.

A server is a blur as she careens through the restaurant, delivering great seafood.

A few years ago we realized it was best to have either a pasta or a secondo. Even sharing a pasta was too much, so we go right to the main dishes: grilled calamaro for Ric and grilled tonno for me. These are best washed down with a crisp Vermentino and usually accompanied by Ric’s favorite veg, cicoria ripassata, a bitter green sauteed with garlic and red pepper flakes. God we are going to miss this stuff when we come back the U.S! Where are we going to find field-grown chicory? Spinach is a reasonable substitute, but not the same.

The decor is classic beach-kitsch, which works. Not a place for romance, the tables are crowded with groups of friends and large families clearly enjoying the hospitality. But there are no children under five allowed, which is another reason to love the place. In fact, on the restaurant’s home page Marco has posted this notice:

Because of unpleasant episodes due to lack of parental (emphasis added) manners, this establishment does not welcome the presence of children under five years (who are) left without direction, nor the entry of strollers or high chairs for reasons of space
Certain of your understanding in advance, thank you, Dear Clientele.
Il Comandante

It seems he had some poorly behaved parents who let their little monsters run around the restaurant, tripping servers and generally causing an unpleasant experience, so he put an end to it: no small children, strollers, nor highchairs. Lots of press coverage, an example here from the British press, and allegations that it is illegal to exclude children, but we have not seen any young ones there and the notice persists. Personally, I love it.

I did not discover teh tuna until about 15 months ago. Now I order it every time. Done to perfection!

I did not discover the tuna until about 15 months ago. Now I order it every time. Done to perfection!

No pizza on this menu, although as you can see we snuck some carbs in courtesy of breading on the calamari. But no dessert and no pasta! Dinner for three with wine and water, the giant antipasto, three secondi, and cicoria was €82.00. We’d easily pay that for two of us in the center of Rome, and often more. It’s worth the taxi fare.

FYI, the address in The Guardian article from 2012 is incorrect. When you go, check the website and be sure to call for a reservation. Tell Il Comandante that the Bartons sent you.

 

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Taverna Rossini, Roma, July 29, 2016

Ahhh, Rossini, you are good to come home to! I have not written about Taverna Rossini in over a year. I think we had come to take it for granted as it is close to home and the only secret to getting a table is to call 2 or 3 hours before you want to dine.

Ric's pizza Romana with anchovies, capers and olives. Very much a standard in Italy.

Ric’s pizza Romana with anchovies, capers, and olives. Very much a standard in Italy.

Rossini is a huge and varied restaurant that still manages to feel like a neighborhood place. The wait staff recognizes us regulars, it is a 15-minute walk from home which is just about perfect (not too close), they have a wonderful outdoor dining area and a robust menu. There are three distinct sections to Rossini: a coffee bar, a pizzeria/taverna, and a ristorante/pescheria where they serve up beautiful fish in an elegant atmosphere. It is all inter-connected and the whole menu available in any section. The owner, Filippo Corvisieri, has a brilliant concept, serving cornetto e caffè in the morning, sandwiches from the bar as well as complete lunches in the taverna, and pulling out the stops in the evening, where the pescheria becomes a bit more elegant and romantic. The non-stop, Noon-2:00AM service is extraordinary. Want pizza at 4:00PM? You can have it!

My pizza Napoli with anchovies. I have come to love the simplicity of Italian pizza and Napoli is my go-to.

My pizza Napoli with anchovies. I have come to love the simplicity of Italian pizza and Napoli is my go-to.

Pizza is almost always our focus, and once again Rossini delivered, our first night back from our month in the Dolomites. We actually read the menu for a change and discovered a new treat:  eggplant “meat”balls. (They sound better in Italian: polpettine di melanzane.) This was our starter, as though we really needed one.

Our pizzas were good, as always. Is it the best pizza in Rome? No, I still reserve that for Dar Poeta, Da Remo and La Pratolina. Rossini is a package. Location, service, selection, ambiance. There is something for everyone here. And try to save room for dessert. The palle di cioccolato (not on the menu; you have to ask for them) are to die for.

Palle di cioccolato: nutella gelato encased in hard, dark chocolate, dressed with shopped walnuts, chocolate sauce and whipped cream. One order has 2 palle, and is plenty to share.

Palle di cioccolato: Nutella gelato encased in hard, dark chocolate, dressed with chopped walnuts, chocolate sauce, and whipped cream. One order has 2 palle, and is plenty to share.

Pizza Quality: 2 I cannot give this a 3, try as I might. It is good pizza, it is just not the very best I have ever had. But it is really good! 

Service: 3 The wait staff is like a well-oiled machine. They put up with my Italian, but we hear them speaking English to the tourists. In true Italian fashion, no one expects a tip. 

Ambiance: 3   The dining rooms are designed in such a way as to provide intimacy despite the size of the place. The outdoor area is open year ’round and is our favorite part of the restaurant. 

Bonus: 1 Extra credit for great fritti, great dolce, and the outdoor space.

Total Points: 9

Returnability: Go-to Place that borders on worth-a-trip-across-town. If you can hop on a Tram 19 or Tram 3, you will be dropped at the door. Why not go?

Sign of quality: a wood-fired oven.

Sign of quality: a wood-fired oven.

Outdoors at Rossini on Friday night. It is packed by 9;00PM.

Outdoors at Rossini on Friday night. It is packed by 9;00PM.

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Ortisei, Val Gardena, July 2016

The best pizza in Ortisei in the Val Gardena is…in Santa Cristina. Spending a full month in this delightful mountain valley afforded us the opportunity to get out of Ortisei and try pizza in neighboring Santa Cristina. Lucky we did because we found a mighty fine pie, worthy of OWP praise.

Pizza Golosona: spicy salami, fresh tomatoes, brie, mushrooms, raddicchio, tomato and mozzarella. So good we ordered it both weeks.

Pizza Golosona: spicy salami, fresh tomatoes, brie, mushrooms, raddicchio, tomato and mozzarella. So good we ordered it both weeks.

In four weeks we dined in three pizzerias: La Tambra in Santa Cristina, Mauriz Keller in Ortisei, and Cascade also in Ortisei. We have eaten at Mauriz Keller at least once each summer since 2012, so have some depth of experience there. Let’s go right to the summaries and pictures of these three options.

La Tambra

Pizza Quality: 3 Unique offerings, such as the Golosona with spicy salami, fresh tomatoes, brie, mushrooms, radicchio, pancetta, and mozzarella. It was swoon-worthy. Excellent crust from a wood-fired oven. It is right up there with our favorites in Roma. Great selection of local wines, too. Try the very affordable house Lagrein.

Service: 3 Efficient, friendly, multi-lingual. They remembered us from one week to the next, which always amazes me. You can reserve online on their website. It is popular for a reason, so do take the time to reserve.

Ambiance: 3   The decor is Tyrolean. It is warm and woody, a place you want to linger. It is also a family place and attracts parties of 6 to 8 people, so it can get a bit noisy, but not raucous. The outside deck was delightful on our first visit, but a cold snap caused us to dine indoors the second time.

La Tambra has an extensive menu beyond pizza and we saw some amazing meat dishes and pastas coming out.

Total Points: 9

Returnability:  The Best! If you are in any of the three little towns of the Val Gardena, make one night pizza night at La Tambra. 

Click any photo for more of La Tambra.

 

Mauriz Keller

Spicy salame and red peppers, a classic Pizza Diavolo with good mozzarella and tomato sauce.

Spicy salame and red peppers, a classic Pizza Diavolo with good mozzarella and tomato sauce.

Pizza Quality: 2 Good pizza, wood-fired of course, classic ingredients without a lot of creativity. The crust stands up to the toppings but there’s nothing particularly spectacular about it. Ingredients are fresh and over the many years we’ve eaten here, it is consistent.

Service: 3 Efficient, friendly, and like every restaurant here, multi-lingual. Mauriz seems to be ever-present assuring satisfaction with both regular locals and the many tourists who dine there. You can reserve online through Trip Advisor and The Fork.

Ambiance: 2   Great Tyrolean-themed somewhat subterranean. The warm and cozy atmosphere belies the size of the place. One point deducted for no outdoor seating.

The menu at Mauriz Keller is huge and having dined there several times, I can vouch for the quality of the pasta as well. Good wine list, but the house wine is fine, too.

Total Points: 8

Returnability: Go-to Place – fine if you are in the area.

A few more photos of what to expect at Mauriz Keller.

 

Cascade

This is another place we have patronized several times over the years. Service is always slow, but the food has been good. Our first meal here was in 2012. I had grilled vegetables with warm camembert. Yum! We’ve had a couple of other meals here over the years and other than slow service, thought it was fine so we decided to try their pizza this time. Error.

My pizza with brie and arugula looked fine...

My pizza with brie and arugula looked fine…

Pizza Quality: 1 This was a tough rating situation. I wanted to give it a “2” as Ric’s pizza was okay. The crust was quite ordinary, but he had great venison sausage. My pizza was a wet mess and that is why it is rated a “1.” I specifically stayed away from mushrooms as they often cause problems and I abhor a soggy pizza. I ordered a pie with tomato sauce, mozzarella, brie, and arugula. What would make that soggy? The arugula goes on fresh at the end and is not exactly a “wet” veg. I think

...until I cut into it and it left a puddle on the plate. Arugula was raw as it should be.

…until I cut into it and it left a puddle on the plate. Arugula was raw as it should be.

undercooking was the problem. Tomato sauce on both pies was negligible and tasteless. Other than Ric’s venison sausage, there was little flavor anywhere.

Service: 2 Slow. Very slow. Just like the last 3 times we’ve eaten there. At least we got in as we had a reservation.

Ambiance: 2   Like every place here, it is Tyrolean-themed. The space is divided in such a way that it does not get loud and seems more intimate. A few tables outdoors, although a more attractive option during the day.

To top it all off, Cascade is expensive.

Total Points: 5

Returnability: DNR – Do not return under any circumstances. Mistakes were made; do not compound them.

 

 

 

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